Tyler Perry told Americans to run away from hate after accepting his Oscar, according to The Washington Times.

“My mother taught me to refuse hate. She taught me to refuse blanket judgment.”

And in this time, with all of the internet and social media and algorithms and everything that wants us to think a certain way, the 24-hour news cycle, it is my hope that all of us would teach our kids, and I want to remember: Just refuse hate. Don’t hate anybody.”

“I refuse to hate someone because they are Mexican or because they are Black or White or [LGBTQ].”

“I refuse to hate someone because they are a police officer.”

“I refuse to hate someone because they are Asian. I would hope we would refuse hate.

“And I want to take this Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award and dedicate it to anyone who wants to stand in the middle.”

“No matter what’s around the wall, stand in the middle.”

“Because that’s where healing happens, that’s where conversation happens, that’s where change happens.”

“It happens in the middle. So, anyone who wants to meet me in the middle to refuse hate, to refuse blanket judgment, and to help lift someone’s feet off the ground, this one is for you, too. God bless you.”

From The Washington Times:

Director and producer Tyler Perry called on Americans to reject hate during his Oscars acceptance speech Sunday, saying healing for the country can happen when people “meet in the middle” and reserve their judgment toward others.

Mr. Perry accepted the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the Academy Awards for his multiple philanthropy efforts in Black communities and those hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. During his speech, Mr. Perry said he learned acceptance through his mother, who grew up in rural Louisiana during the Jim Crow era and that he now refuses to paint anyone with a broad brush.